My Cat Grooming Training

I have worked with animals for many years.

90% of cat grooming is holding on to the cat.

10% of cat grooming is everything else:)

My many years of handling animals and learning about their anatomy so I can handle them . . .

  1. graduated grooming school
  2. house call veterinary nurse administering medications and fluids
  3. managed busy animal shelter
  4. emergency animal rescue in Chapel Hill, NC
  5. internship with “big cats” at The Bronx Zoo
  6. kennel worker
  7. post-baccalaureate biology honors program at CUNY
  8. hundreds of hours of volunteer service at animal shelters, and more. . .
  9. former member of Girl Scout Mounted Patrol in San Antonio, ha ha. The good old days:)

Cat Grooming Cuteness

I groomed a little teeny long-haired white cat this Saturday. Wow. So much sweetness in such a little package.  She’s a clinger, a hugger. Velcro-kitty.  She plasters herself against me when I bathe her then again when I blow dry her, which works out because that way my wet uniform dries off, ha ha.

What feels better than being hugged by an adorable cat? Huh? Is there any feeling that’s better? I could eat her up she’s so cute.

She just had some extra fluff and clumped together fur on her haunches. Brushed her, bathed her, dried her, brushed her again, trimmed claws and she’s good to go.

Experience, Education and Training

I have worked with animals for many years.

  1. graduated grooming school
  2. house call veterinary nurse administering medications and fluids
  3. managed busy animal shelter
  4. emergency animal rescue in Chapel Hill, NC
  5. internship with “big cats” at The Bronx Zoo
  6. kennel worker
  7. post-baccalaureate biology honors program at CUNY
  8. hundreds of hours of volunteer service at animal shelters, and more. . .
  9. former member of Girl Scout Mounted Patrol in San Antonio, ha ha. The good old days:)cropped-riding1.jpg

Chipotle and Cat Grooming

Definitely one of my weirdest headlines, but wait, there’s a logic to it. Chipotle and cat care share something.

Chipotle’s been in the news due to a large number of food poisoning outbreaks.

Seem like they were so busy focusing on (and bragging about) being GMO-free, locally sourced and fresh that they forgot the most important part of running a restaurant.

Don’t poison your customers!

“Marler said: ‘I think the Chipotle business model is a good one,’ and added: ‘There’s nothing incompatible about being local, organic and fresh and also safe. I just think they haven’t yet figured out how to embrace food safety with the same zeal they’ve shown for the other things they’re striving for.’”

We’re always being told about this toxin or that toxin. Chemicals are now supposed to be our enemy.  Go all natural or die a lingering death.  I visit many homes where smart, caring people are concerned about such things.

Just don’t “pull a Chipotle.”  What does that mean? It means focusing on potential, possible, long-term problems while ignoring day-to-day issues. It means spending an hour deciding which gluten-free sourced-from-local-buffalo cat food to buy while your cat’s claws grow into their paw pad, their fur mats into a dense ball and they lose their mind from boredom because no one is playing with them.

Daily grooming and cat maintenance can awfully dull.  Creating and enforcing food safety rules can also be awfully dull. As the incredibly well-paid owners of CEO discovered, dull work can be the most important work of all.

 

 

 

 

Yes, Persians Do Need to Be Groomed THAT Much

Every day. Brushed every day. Yes. Really. I am not kidding.

Persians are a breed “created” for people who have abundant time or the ability to hire a groomer.  Aristocrats, for example, are the perfect owners for Persians!

The options are . . . hire or hustle. Hire a groomer or hustle through a nightly combing.

“But MY cat doesn’t get matted. I only brush her once a month.”

There are exceptions to the daily brushing rule, since some  breeders cross their Persians with other breeds, or breed with an eye towards an easier coat. Even if your Persian isn’t matted, they’re going to have shed fur embedded in their coat if you don’t comb them out.

I’ve grown to love Persians. They’re funny, adorable little creatures.

“Nicholas-Claude Fabri de Peiresec, an advisor to the Parliament od Aix-en-Provence, bought two cats to France from Turkey (perhaps they were Angora in type).  These cats were highly prized by the European Aristocracy.”

“Grooming (brushing, combing and cleaning) is a considerable undertaking.  The Persian’s long hair is prone to the rapid formation of knots and tufts.  It is therefore essential to untangle the coat every day.  Persians shed in spring and summer. Their eyes, which produce tears constantly, must be cleaned regularly.”

U.S. Veterinary Care is Amazingly Good

We all like to complain about the imperfections of veterinary medicine in the United States. I do it too.

I read an article that shocked me into realizing how good we (and our pets) have it. We live in a culture that has resources, a belief in compassion toward animals, and excellent veterinary schools.  We have access to a safe supply of drugs. We have a large number of intelligent, ambitious veterinarians. What a great accomplishment.

“India is so big that the veterinary education and abilities there are much higher in the cities than in the boonies. . . .  in veterinary schools north of Mumbai no companion animal medicine is being taught. . .  An upcoming article is on what basic instruments do you need for surgery, how do you hold a scalpel, how do you drape a dog for surgery, what’s a sterile technique? It may sound ridiculous to a vet in Seattle or Portland, but it’s a tremendous challenge.

Can you imagine going to a veterinarian who does not know how to hold a scalpel?!!

 

Which Cat Requires More Grooming?

Afterbath

sphynx2

If you guessed that the black domestic short haired cat —  a common house cat — requires more grooming, you’d be . . . wrong.

Sphynx cats don’t have much fur, as you can see.  Their body makes oil, just like other cats, but there’s no fur to absorb the oil.  Unless you want to see oily stains on your furniture, you probably should bathe them once a month or more. Not all cats are alike, so some are more oily than others. You will also see brown gunk on their claws. This should be cleaned off every so often.

You can get away with bathing a domestic short haired cat as infrequently as once a year. Brush them once a week and you’re good to go. Heck, some never get bathed, but from experience, I’d say it’s good to bathe them every so often because it helps get rid of shed fur that’s stuck to their coat.  Makes them lighter, fluffier, less prone to hairballs, and of course cleaner. After all, saliva is not the same as water. I bathe my cat about once a month because I’m addicted to the scent and feel of fluffy fur. She likes being adored, so it works out for both of us.

Sphynx cats are fun. Lively. Sociable. Be ready to bathe them though. Don’t expect a free ride! I’ve only been asked to groom Sphynx cats once.  They’re a whole different deal from furry cats. Their fragile appearance makes me nervous, but they’re probably as resilient as other cats once you get past the fact that they’re butt-naked!